Quick Answer: Is Nasal Spray Bad For Your Heart?

What happens if you use nasal spray too much?

The longer you use a spray decongestant, the more likely you are to get the rebound phenomenon.

It can lead to chronic sinusitis and other serious, long-term problems.

Give your doctor a call if you’re having any of these issues: It’s all in your nose..

How long does nasal spray withdrawal last?

Recovery typically takes less than one week and withdrawal symptoms can be easily managed. Research suggests that the best way to stop overusing DNSs is to switch to a steroid nasal spray.

What is the best cough medicine for heart patients?

The safest cough and cold medicines for you are:chlorepheniramine (Chlortrimeton® or AllerChlor®)guaifenesin with dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM®)loratadine (Claritin®)

What is the best medicine for the heart?

The Big 6 Heart MedicationsStatins — to lower LDL cholesterol. … Aspirin — to prevent blood clots. … Clopidogrel — to prevent blood clots. … Warfarin — to prevent blood clots. … Beta-blockers — to treat heart attack and heart failure and sometimes used to lower blood pressure. … ACE inhibitors — to treat heart failure and lower blood pressure.

What is the most effective sinus decongestant?

Best Overall: GoodSense Nasal Decongestant One tablet of this non-drowsy formula every four hours—but no more than six tablets in 24 hours—promises to temporarily ease any sinus congestion and pressure that comes along with colds, hay fever, and allergies.

Can Sudafed damage your heart?

Pseudoephedrine Decongestants Over the years, though, there have been reports of heart attacks, strokes, disturbed heart rhythms, and other cardiovascular problems with use of pseudoephedrine.

What drugs should be avoided in heart failure?

Heart failure medicine dos and don’ts: What to avoidNon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). … Cold and cough medicines with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. … Alka-Seltzer® – this has too much sodium (salt).Calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem (Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Verelan). … Before you take any medicine, herb, or supplement, call your doctor.

Is it OK to use saline nasal spray daily?

A preservative-free nasal saline spray like Flo Saline Plus can be used daily and is also handy to have when out and about, to help wash away irritants in the nose when exposed to them.

What are the side effects of saline nasal spray?

What are the side effects of sodium chloride-nasal spray?Allergic reaction (rare)Sneezing.Cough.Eye irritation if sprayed in the eye.Nose irritation.Abnormal taste.

Which antibiotic is safe in heart patients?

In patients with heart disease, though, azithromycin and other macrolide antibiotics – such as clarithromycin, erythromycin, and telithromycin – can speed up the heart so that it beats very fast, up to 200 times per minute.

How can I unblock my nose?

Here are eight things you can do now to feel and breathe better.Use a humidifier. A humidifier provides a quick, easy way to reduce sinus pain and relieve a stuffy nose. … Take a shower. … Stay hydrated. … Use a saline spray. … Drain your sinuses. … Use a warm compress. … Try decongestants. … Take antihistamines or allergy medicine.

Can nasal spray cause damage?

Nasal spray addiction is not a true “addiction,” but it can lead to tissue damage inside the nose. This can result in swelling and long-term stuffiness that leads to further use and overuse of the spray. In some cases, a person may need to undergo additional treatment, and possibly surgery, to correct any damage.

What decongestant is safe for heart patients?

In the drug realm, antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), cetirizine (Zyrtec), and loratadine (Claritin) can help with a stuffy nose are safe for the heart. Nasal sprays deliver a decongestant right where you need it.

Is phenylephrine bad for your heart?

Most topical nasal decongestants (e.g., oxymetazoline, phenylephrine, and naphazoline) also carry the warning against use by patients with heart disease and high blood pressure, due to the possibility that some of the chemical might be absorbed and reach blood levels that would endanger their health.